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Celebrities and Their Film Cameras

Celebrities... they're just like us.


If you thought we mortals were the only ones to adore analog photography, think again. The likes of Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, and Zendaya have been spotted out and about with their film cameras, and for some, it definitely adds to the top 5 reasons to shoot with film.


Wondering what film cameras they are using and what they are snapping? Find out below.


1. Kendall Jenner and her Contax T2


Instagram: @kendalljenner

This member of the Kardashian-Jenner clan has been spotted with not one, but two, Contax T2 cameras in different colors. Kenny also doesn't shy away from professing her love for film, posting snaps on her social media, and even taking her camera on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. Some are even crediting her for the surge in prices of the Contax T2, which was originally released in 1990. With all the hype surrounding the camera, you'd be lucky to find a used one for less than $1,000. The camera does have a fantastic Carl Zeiss lens, however, the thousand-dollar price tag is definitely a hefty one, especially for a point and shoot.


2. Gigi Hadid and her disposables


Similar to gal-pal, Kendall Jenner, Gigi also has been spotted with a film camera of her own. She even has a dedicated Instagram account for her snaps where you can see the glitz and glamour of the model's life in film. As you can probably tell by her clever naming of the account, Gigi uses disposable cameras to shoot her photos. While they might not give you the quality that a camera with a Carl Zeiss lens does, disposables are really fun to shoot with, and they don't cost much at all! It also means that you can explore different types of cameras every now and then and have fun experimenting.



3. Zendaya and her Contax G2


Another Contax user on the list is Zendaya. While she has been spotted on several occasions with Kendall's favorite T2, it is the G2 that is known to be the world's most advanced rangefinder camera, often times compared to the Leica M6. It has a bit more settings to tinker with, which can be a hassle for some, of course, but it does allow the users to further learn the basics of film photography. Unfortunately, this does come at quite a high price tag, as used ones retail for a starting price of $1,200, and can go up to around $2,000.


4. Frank Ocean and his Contax T3


To finish off the list, we have another Contax user, only this time, a T3. Frank famously captured the 2019 Met Gala with his Contax T3, giving fans a glimpse of fashion's most celebrated event of the year. Some might argue that the T2 is the most stylish of the two, but the T3 does have an improved Carl Zeiss lens that gives you even sharper and higher quality photos, that is if you are willing to pay the price. If you think the T2 and G2 are expensive, wait till you hear the price for the Contax T3. Prices for used ones start at around $2,000 and can go up to around $3,000. Yikes!



If your favorite A-listers are on this list, you'll probably be interested to know how you can get your hands on the same film cameras they are using. Bad news is -- most of these film cameras would cost you at least $1,000. If you're committed to film photography and are looking to upgrade your gears, it's probably not such a bad idea to get one of the cameras listed yourself, as they are of high quality. However, if you're just looking to have fun snapping a few photos here and there with a film camera, you probably don't want to spend a fortune on it just yet.


Well, here's the good news. If you're a beginner looking to get started in film photography, there are plenty of decent reusable film cameras, such as the Ilford Harman reusable camera, that will give you a fun analog experience without the hassle of learning all the technicalities of a film camera. Although, those looking for a deeper understanding and learning of film might find it more fitting to get one of the top SLR film cameras for beginners. Either way, as these celebrities have shown, #filmisnotdead.



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